WORK WITH MAJOR SCALE PATTERNS

PREVIEW

SCROLL DOWN FOR FULL LESSONS

arrow

WORK WITH MAJOR SCALE PATTERNS

The major scale is perhaps the most important tonal element in all of music. You use it for building chords, measuring intervals, charting chord progressions, and playing melodies and harmony. I touch on the major scale in one way or another in all of my music theory teaching. Here in this course, I explain the basics of the scale and focus on major scale fretboard patterns — the kind used for playing melodies, riffs, lead guitar solos, and bass lines.Topics covered in this course include:

  • Taking a look at the formula of whole-steps and half-steps that make up the seven-tone major scale
  • Seeing how scale patterns are formed and fingered on the fretboard
  • Practicing scale patterns by playing along with accompaniment
  • Transposing scale patterns to all twelve keys
  • Exploring various scale pattern types including three-notes-per-string patterns
  • Developing fingering and picking dexterity by playing melodic patterns
  • Getting to know familiar songs that feature prominent major scale melodies, riffs, solos, and bass lines

How far you take things in this course depends on which type of guitar player you are. If you're primarily a rhythm guitar player, and you're only interested in playing enough of the major scale to add simple riffs and melodies to your chord changes, then you won't need to work hard at memorizing and rehearsing the patterns and related techniques--just getting a surface knowledge will be enough. If, on the other hand, you aspire to become a proficient lead guitarist, then you'll want to meticulously complete each lesson and follow my suggestions on how to further your practice with additional exercises. Whatever the case, all guitarists will better understand music and be able to study higher forms of theory when they get a proper grasp on the major scale, its construction, and its layout on the fretboard.

shadow-ornament