ADD CHORD TONES AND EXTENSIONS TO CHORDS

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ADD CHORD TONES AND EXTENSIONS TO CHORDS

Chords are constructed from roots, 3rds, and 5ths. These intervals come from the major scale where the scale degrees produce different triads, some major and some minor (and one diminished). Guitar players add chord tones and extensions to triads by incorporating other degrees from the major scale. These added scale degrees include 2nds, 4ths, 6ths, 7ths, 9ths, 11ths, and 13ths.

In this course, you break away from the standard major and minor chords to play new chords with more depth and color. You get to know what the little numbers next to chord names mean and how you can form new chord shapes.

Rather than have you play all the chord types that are taught in traditional theory, I use this course to focus you on chords that guitarists typically use in popular music. Of course, I don’t cover every single chord type that you may come across, but I give you enough examples so that you can begin to make sense of other types of chords when you encounter them.

Before you get started playing new chords and playing song examples, I need to give you a heads up on something that might cause you confusion. When music is based on more complicated chords, this often goes along with more complicated composition techniques. You get started with new chords by learning which types of 7th chords are naturally built on major scale degrees, however, many of the song examples I give you don’t follow the major scale in this way. In other words, you might have a 7th chord that is naturally built on the 5th degree of the major scale used on another degree where something else is naturally built. The reasons for this are explained in Fretboard Theory Volume II courses where I get into harmonic minor, modal interchange, borrowed chords, and key changes. For now, just focus on learning the new chord shapes that this course introduces and wait to figure out any other details until later.

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